2015 7 Mar

Lately, I’ve found quite a few unlabeled cassette tapes that I’m thinking would be great for a third addition for the Guittard Tapes. It’ll be a trilogy now! The tunes have been heavy with pedals including digital delay, distortion, and phaser. I was wowed when I heard the tunes. The challenge as always is to get them transferred from the tapes to the digital tascam machine and then finally to the laptop where I can mix it down. Part of the challenge is that the originally Tascam machine that I recorded the songs has a defective second track. I cannot hear anything while listening. So I have to flip the tape over and record the track now from the third track which now plays backwards. So, once on the computer I have to reverse the track back to normal and then line up all the tracks in sequence so that it sounds in time. There’s no click track so I have to look and listening for anything hiss, click, or whatever.

So here are a few stand out tracks thus far:
Phaser Attack – Most dominant effect is the phaser pedal with trippy distortion, screaming Rickenbacker and drum machine.  Great!

Feedback Rock – Most dominant here is the out of control digital delay pedal with tremolo pedal and chaotic Rickenbacker.  I guess it was a few months before 9-11 when a lot of bad vibes were swirling about.

Vacuum B-Bender – This is an interest piece in that I used a vacuum cleaner hose in front of the amplifier to trick up the sound.  I remember my friend Jolie visiting me and seeing this vacuum hose next to my recording gear and tripping out! Well, here’s the song.  It has my B-Bender on it.

Get It Together Man – This one’s really weird.  The dominant sound track is an actual guy in Hollywood having a melt down outside my apartment banging a shovel on the ground and screaming.  Imagine that! The music is quite chaotic and is a picture of my life back in 2001.  Things were not perfect in all areas but I was still persevering with my music.  The main influence was Beck and his Stereopathetic Soulmanure album.

1989 Highlander Band

Published under Lifesend this post
2014 20 Mar

The tunes from the tapes just keep coming.  It is a time capsule into the life that began in late 1999 and lasted until about 2004.  The Guittard Tapes era was an especially  creative period of my life.  In 1999, after three years of being a working stiff at an insurance company in Dallas, I struck out for a music school in Hollywood.  I made a dry run out there to search for an apartment and found one near Hollywood and Highland that was available for $925 a month.  I wonder what it is now that they remodeled that whole area where the Academy Awards are now held.

I was bright-eyed and optimistic, thinking that I could do something important.  At the school, I put up flyers to see if anybody was interested in making a “Byrds-influenced” band.  I had NO takers.  It was kinda weird that no one was turned on to the jangly psychedelic music.  Henry and I began to hold auditions for our band The Ragas in my Hollywood apartment.  We had a whole biker gang show up but it just wasn’t the vibe we wanted.  We also drove way out to the Inland Empire to audition a drummer.  Maybe it wasn’t the best thing to put an ad in the L.A. Weekly about our little band.  We never did find anyone that way.  Imagine the characters going through my apartment to audition.  One guy didn’t have a bass so we let him use my bass and he picked up a coaster to use as a pick.  That was weird.

During this time, I was soaking up the vibes of Southern California and often found myself in the Brian Jonestown Massacre scene.  The music was all around me and the folks in Texas wondered exactly what I was doing.  The Guittard Tapes were what I was doing.  I have hundreds of tapes from that period and it is great that I still have the tapes because for a period of ten years I had no idea where the tapes were.  I had spent some time in Bulgaria and my stuff was kinda scattered everywhere.

Jim Cine GrillOctober 1999 – Hollywood

The tunes from the Guittard Tapes have been extracted from tapes for over the last year.  I’ve put out two volumes of the Guittard Tapes and now I’m working to possibly put out a third volume.  If you want to know what was going on in my life between 1999 and 2003, listen to the tapes.  One song that I wrote just after two weeks of being in L.A. was called “Standing in the Doorway.”  What prompted the song was the earthquake that occurred on October 16, 1999.  I had never experienced a quake and so that day I did at two o’clock in the morning.  I didn’t know what to do with all the rattling pipes on the third story apartment building so I got out of bed and stood in the doorway.  It seemed like forever the ground was shaking.  It was  a 7.1 magnitude earthquake.

After quitting the school, I mainly went to a lot of shows with the Quarter After, Beachwood Sparks and others.  I was writing the whole time.  For awhile I was in a band with Cliff Magreta and Rob Campanella called the Belle Isle.  It was really a happening time.  And then 9-11 occurred and it seemed that a lot of things changed.  The optimism wasn’t there like it used to be.  As part of the Guittard Tapes there was a tune a did a few weeks after 9-11 that is an instrumental and I named it “3 Weeks After.”  It has a psychedelic trippy feel with Rickenbacker Twelve String and sitar.

Byron& JimWith Byron Berline at McCabe’s Guitar Shop

 Around late 2001  to 2002, my brother Bob was also in Los Angeles and for a few months we were in a band together with a guy named Andy McCutcheon.  It was really crazy how I met Andy.  My brother had been auditioning for bands as a bass player.  He came over to my apartment and played me a CD of Andy McCutcheon.  Instantly, I recognized it.  I had heard the music a few years earlier back in Texas as I had found him on MP3.com. I had previously downloaded Andy’s music back in 1998 or early 1999.  I had never met him but he was into psychedelic type 1960’s music.  It was really wild that my brother would say to me that he was auditioning for this band.  And so after a month or so, I was in Andy’s band as a rhythm guitarist.  We had some shows at the Crooked Bar, The Gig, the Rainbow Bar and Grill, and some other places.  I had read about Led Zeppelin hanging at the Rainbow and being up to no good there.

Scan10002Myself, Brother Bob, and Andy McCutcheon

During this period, I was working odd jobs at a rental car place, a talent agency, and some other places.  I did have the misfortune of being robbed of several guitars and some of the material in the Guittard Tapes deal with the loss of guitars and themes of betrayal and a sense of digging in my heels to the ground to stay in L.A. at all costs.  It cost me a lot but the Guittard Tapes to me our priceless.  It’s a musical diary.

Here are a few songs that I’ve just extracted recently from the tapes.

You Are On Track

You Are On Track by Guittard Tapes 2

The song is trying to hype myself up to stay and continue with the musical pursuit in Los Angeles. It wasn’t going exactly how I had hoped but this was an honest plea to dig in.

Jangly Ordinary Guy
Jangly Ordinary Guy by Guittard Tapes 2

The lyrics for this tune was written at a coffee shop on Melrose Blvd. I was waiting to meet someone and they did not show up. Being a bit frustrated I wrote the tune. The music for this one is more jangly with my 12 string Rickenbacker and I play simple drum beat. The other version I play the B-Bender Telecaster and it is more a country-rock feel.

Beach Basement Session
Beach Basement Session by Guittard Tapes 2

This one here is a early version of Beach before the more well known one on my “California Daze” album. The tune here was recorded in a care-free way trying to emulate the vibe of Dylan on the Basement Sessions album with the Band. The recording is imperfect but I’m not about perfection.

Station
Station basement session by Guittard Tapes 2

This tune is another raw alternate take. It was again trying to be recorded in a basement session way that was carefree and emotional.

I left L.A. in February 2003 and the picture below is just after I came back to Dallas, Texas.
Jim February 2003

 

Published under Lifesend this post
2013 21 Dec

The lyrics for this song “California” were written during a time of reflection concerning my three and a half year mission pursuing music in Los Angeles, California from 1999-2003. (If interested in other songs from this era, please download my two volume album called “The Guittard Tapes” –  Volume 1  and Volume 2.)

Things ended on a kind of sour note with three guitars being stolen. Consequently, I left L.A. as it was unsafe and too expensive to live.  My mind was in a sort of fog upon return to Texas understandably and I put my Rickenbackers away for some time.  The music was still in my heart but I needed a break.

The original feeling of the song, at least when I wrote the lyrics, was to be a Woody Guthrie type “hard times” song. But after reading over the lyrics I condensed it down a bit and decided against the folkie version. Possibly in the future I could put out a folkier version.

I recorded the song in Fort Worth, Texas using my Tascam Recording machine. I played the keyboard, electric guitar, tambourine, and sing the vocals.

California

I left busted and disgusted.
My thoughts were surely not trusted.
I was bombed out and wiped out.
But not down and out.

I was robbed and without a job.
But I didn’t turn to a snob.
I was pushed, and shoved and almost knifed.
All I want was my life.

I had threats against my life
By hoodlums with much strife.
I’ve seen the inside of jails
There were only thugs.

I know the 3 of Clubs bar.
The place where the BJM star.
I’ve played the Sunset Strip
Go there for a special trip.

Chorus

California, I never knew you.
Until I got to you.
California, I never knew you.
Until I got to you.

I’ve trekked to Santa Ana’s Rickenbacker
To practice in a tent with McGuinn.
I’ve seen the 24-hour church
Go there if you must.

I left a school and was a fool,
Cause I didn’t want to muck about.
The guys there were like robots.
Not my best place.

I put money down on apartments.
They took my deposit and never gave it back.
I never even moved in.
Oh well, that’s allright.

Chorus

California, I never knew you.
Until I got to you.
California, I never knew you.
Until I got to you.

I’m not a bad guy.
Just trying to follow God’s will.
Nobody likes that.
But I don’t really care.

I’ve had panic attacks on Highway 101.
It was not so fun in the sun.
I think that God was there.
I think that God was there.

Words and Music by Jim Guittard 2013

Raga Jim and 3 of Clubs Smokes Girl

Drawing by Henry McGuinn

Published under Lifesend this post
2013 30 Sep

Listen to the Podcast below:                                                                                                                                                                                                          

Over the past six weeks, Jay Daniels of the Muffin Junkee Serves Tunes with Your Tea show out of British Columbia and I have been working on a podcast that is about my “Busted In Bulgaria” album that I released in 2008.  In 2013, things are still a bit uncertain in Bulgaria.  That is why I chose this particular album to do a show.  During my 2006 – 2008 Peace Corps service, times were quite uncertain also.

After my first year as an English teacher, the second year started with a bang when there was a country-wide teacher strike in all of Bulgaria.  As a volunteer, my job was to come to class everyday whether the students were there or not.  Mostly, they were not and so I seized the opportunity to write down some of my thoughts on the situation and that would become the basis for much of the Busted in Bulgaria album.

The podcast is a selection of songs that both Jay and I compiled.  We chose the following songs:

1. Listen To Your Voice
2. Hoola Hoop Girl
3. Rico
4. Breaking the Language Barrier
5. 8A Class
6. Stachkata
7  Survival Mode
8. What’s Your Role in Life
9. Be Real True
10.I want to go to the Moon (2013)
11.The Sun Shines Today

In the show, you will hear commentary about each song which focuses on what was going on at the time of its writing and recording.  Also included in the podcast are some surreal psychedelic skits and a nice segment on Bulgarian breakfast foods to go along with Jay’s breakfast theme.

cover

Please check out some of Jay’s other podcasts at his buzzsprout site.  You may follow him at his Muffin Junkee Tunes for Tea Facebook page.  Or at ITunes.

I hope you will enjoy.

 

 

 

 

 

Hard at Work                                          Boza-man Statue – Radomir, BG

crazy hair jim and boza man

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download Busted in Bulgaria here:

Published under Good Music, Lifesend this post
2013 31 Jul

I wrote the song and recorded it around 2001 in Hollywood, California on my 4-track Tascam machine. I play a jangly rhythm Rickenbacker, drums, and lead guitar on another 12-String Rickenbacker. The piece was me trying to play jazz.  Here is a video I put together from public domains clips.

You can download and listen to the song for free here:

In making the video, I found some clips that were either in the public domain or they could be used because they were uploaded as part of creative commons licensing.

The clips I used in the video are from:

1. Reg Kehoe and His Marimba Queens (ca. early 1940s)

The clip was produced as a “Soundie” which was the precursor to music videos that we all know. The 3-Minute soundies were viewed on coin-operated jukeboxes that could be found in clubs, nightclubs, restaurants, and bars.

Mills Panoram Soundie Jukebox

Mills Panoram Soundie Jukebox

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. The cult classic “Reefer Madness” (1936)

The rest of the video comes from home videos from my childhood growing up in Texas in the 1970s.

Published under Musicsend this post
2013 20 Jul

Over the last fifteen years, I’ve recorded quite a few Byrds covers.  The first Byrds album that I bought was their third album entitled “Fifth Dimension” which was released in July 1966.  The 1996 Columbia reissue has a few extra bonus tracks.  The interview track is one of my favorites.  I still feel quite attached to this album.

I’ve recorded several tracks from the 5D album (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ) .  Mr. Tambourine album (6 and 9).  Younger Than Yesterday (8).  And Sweetheart of the Rodeo (7).

1. 5D (Jim)

  • Jim Guittard – electric bass, guitar, lead guitar, organ, vocals

2. What’s Happening?!? (The Ragas)

  • Henry McGuinn – lead guitar, vocals
  • Jim Guittard – guitar

3. Eight Miles High (The Ragas)

  • Henry McGuinn – 12-String acoustic lead guitar, vocals
  • Jim Guittard – acoustic guitar, vocals

4. Eight Miles High (Jim)

  • Jim Guittard – guitar, vocals

5. Captain Soul (Jim)

  • Jim Guittard – drums, electric bass, electric guitar, guitar, hand claps

6. Mr. Tambourine Man (The Ragas)

  • Henry McGuinn – lead guitar, vocals
  • Jim Guittard – guitar, vocals

7. You Ain’t Going Nowhere (The Ragas)

  • Henry McGuinn – lead acoustic guitar, vocals
  • Jim Guittard – acoustic guitar, vocals

8. Thoughts and Words (Jim)

  • Jim Guittard – acoustic guitar, backwards guitar, vocals

9. Spanish Harlem Incident (Jim)

  • Jim Guittard – electric bass, electric guitar, drum machine, vocals
  • Katia Guittard – voice
Published under Musicsend this post
2013 10 Jun

The Muffin Junkee episode 7 podcast.

The concept for the “Guittard Tapes” came over ten years after many of the songs were recorded. Some of the songs were actual early demos for songs for my “California Daze” album. Originally, the “Guittard Tapes” album was released in June 2012 and contained only sixteen songs. Since then I have uncovered many more songs that I consider as part of the Guittard Tapes period (1993-2003).

The cassette tapes that made up the Guittard Tapes were lost for ten years. In 2006, I had put all my belongings in several storage places in preparation to go to Bulgaria for the Peace Corps. In 2008, I returned to the States and was flopping on couches at various family members and I could not locate the tapes. I wasn’t sure where they were. I had my things in four different locations! In the spring of 2012, I was ecstatic when my dad called me to say that he had some of my stuff in his storage unit which he needed to downsize. My wife and I went to Dallas and sure enough there were the Guittard Tapes in one of my storage boxes.

It was in 1993 that my songwriting and recording began on the newly bought Tascam 4-Track machine I acquired. Instead of playing video games and zonking out on pizza, I began recording and being creative. During my college days at Western State College of Colorado, I recorded a lot of cover songs. I consider these as part of the Guittard Tapes as well but have chosen to release them separately and unofficially because they are cover songs.

In Gunnison, I began recording Tom Petty, the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, the Doors, and Nirvana. The Guittard Tapes are a look at my early writing. One of the earliest songs I wrote is called “But Not Right Now.”

It was about living in the college dorm and having to put up with rude behavior of potluck roommates. There are also some songs that I did with friends of mine where a guy named Clayton Coates who is a pastor now did the singing: A-Listen, Clayton Blues, and Gotta Get Out of this Place.


The songs were recorded in Dallas, Wichita Falls, and Huntsville, Texas, Gunnison, Colorado, and Hollywood, California. Looking back on it, I wanted to call it the Guittard Tapes because it is a nod at the infamous “Nixon Tapes.” I was born during the Nixon Administration and believe that Nixon was a gadget guy. He liked to document everything in his life and it turned out that the tapes became his downfall but in my case the tapes, to me, are my upswing. I believe the Guittard Tapes represent the initial seed of my dream. It even began before 1993 with my dad’s dictation machine and in 2013 the music holds up in its lo-fi honest way. Nixon would be proud!

I still hope to release more Guittard Tapes. The time period is significant in that the tragedy of September 11th occurred at that time. It was so innocent and optimistic before 9-11 and after became more cynical and pessimistic. However, the tapes are a slice of time and the music is available for everyone to listen and download. The process of extracting the music from the tapes to MP3 format was quite complicating.

Transferring process:
What I had to do was record each track separately from the old tapes on the old Tascam 4-Track machine to my new digital 4-track machine by lining in a guitar cord from the old tape 4-Track to the new one. Each track was done one at a time. The tricky part is the starting point for the individual tracks in a song may not always line up to the other tracks of the song. Also, the second track on the cassette 4track machine didn’t sound. So I had to flip the tape over and then the second track could be heard but backwards in the 3rd track spot.

After transferring all the tracks of a song to the digital another challenge is that the speed of the old 4-Track is at a different speed than the digital. So basically what you hear on the digital sounds like chipmunks. To fix this, I had to dump the tracks from the digital 4-Track to my laptop which has Adobe Audition 3. There, I was able to fix the second track. I would reverse it back to how it should be. And then I had to slow down the digital tracks so that it would sound “normal” speed.

Some of the tracks are still a bit out of rhythm because I was doing it mainly by ear when mixing it on the laptop. Some of the songs had a count off for a guide but many of the songs did not. Many times the count off sound bled into the other tracks and that helped me to make sure everything was lined up as good as possible.

It was quite a process. I even did some math to figure out how much time to cut. I looked for a certain lyric I sang in the song and marked the timing notation of the editing software and lined things up with that number. It was not exact but that’s what I did. I’m sure there would be more exact ways.

Bob and Jim Guittard UT Austin – May 2001

Bob's Graduation 2001 Austin Texas

Gotta Get Out of Here
Waiting Around this hard ol’ town.                                                                                                                                                                                                Gotta get outta here.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 The freaks and the bums all being dumb.
Gotta get outta here.                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Hearing the sound in the corner lounge.                                                                                                                                                                                           Gotta get outta here.                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Seeing an Elvis walk on by.
Gotta get outta here.
Saw a girl walk on by.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                I think I’ll stay for a while.
Repeat all 1X

Story behind:
In 2001, I wrote the lyrics for this one while sitting in the lobby of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. The hotel is known for being the place where the first Academy Awards took place in 1929. It was just down the street from where I lived while I was attending the Musicians Institute.

At that time, I was getting a bit weary of the Hollywood scene. The music school had turned out to be disappointing and Hollyweird was taking its toll on me. I wanted to move to a different location because of a home invasion robbery and because it seemed that freaks and tourists were everywhere along Hollywood Blvd.

One time while waiting at Hollywood and Highland, a complete stranger asked me if I wanted some hash. I noticed quickly that there was a guy dressed up as Elvis standing close by and told the drug pusher pointing to Elvis that I didn’t want any hash but that Elvis might. The “Elvis” impersonator quickly told the drug pusher that he didn’t feel called to smoke hash. For this song, my writing method was to sit and observe. In the song, I make reference to this “Elvis” that I had seen around. There was a lounge at the Hollywood Roosevelt named the Cinegrill. It was where Gene Clark (the Byrds’ tambourine man) last performed in April 1991 before his death about a month later. (When I first got to Hollywood, my mother took a photo of me under the Cinegrill sign. I hadn’t learned about Gene Clark performing there yet.)

Recording: It was recorded after the move to a new apartment in the Los Feliz area of Los Angeles on a Tascam 4-Track machine. I played a 12-String acoustic guitar with and without a capo, drums, and did the singing.

Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel (Cinegrill) 1999 – Hollywood Boulevard

Jim Cine Grill

Tired (Acoustic/Psychedelic Version)
Tired of being sad
Tired of being mad
I do the right thing
But I can’t feel my wings and fly.

Tired of being sad
Tired of being mad
I do the right thing
But I can’t feel my wings and fly.

Chorus
When will I do what You want?
When will I stop having to pretend?
I hate feeling bad.
I want to feel the way I did
As a kid.

Tired of feeling bad
Tired of feeling mad

Story behind:
Both of the versions were recorded in 2001 about the same time in Los Angeles on my 4-Track Tascam machine. At the time, I often experimented with sounds by using my BOSS Digital Delay pedal as a tool to create or inspire me. The Psychedelic Version of Tired is pretty experimental. I hooked up the pedal to an electric keyboard and got some interesting sounds. I had been turned onto Roland’s Vintage Space Echo machine. I was trying to get that kind of sound with my digital delay pedal.

The tune had a kind of weary feel to it. I was just tired of “twisting in the wind.” The phrase came to me as my brother called me once to get a status update on my goings on in California after he had returned to Texas earlier that year. I was digging my heels firmly trying to prove that I could make it in California. I was waiting on the right thing to happen but was getting mad that it wasn’t happening. The song was also a kind of prayer.

Recording:
Psychedelic Version – Acoustic guitar, keyboards, and singing.
Acoustic Version – Acoustic guitar and Singing.

Getting There Is Not Easy
Just wanna be right.
Just wanna be fine.
Something’ll come in time.
Getting there is not easy.
Getting there is not easy

Just wanna move weight.
Just wanna stand straight.
Something’ll give to flight.
Getting there is not easy.
Getting there is not so easy.

Just wanna break through.
Just wanna be free.
Something’ll give to might.
Getting there is not so easy.
Getting there is not so easy.

Just wanna be real.
Just wanna have sight.
Something will show real bright.
Getting there is not so easy.
Getting there is not so easy.

Just wanna be right.
Just wanna be fine.
Something’ll come in time.
Getting there is not so easy.
Getting there is not so easy.

Just wanna move weight.
Just wanna stand straight.
Something will give to flight.
Getting there is not so easy.

Story behind:
It was recorded in January 2002 with a Byrds influence. The song is similar in spirit with “Gotta Get Out of Here.” It speaks about my love-hate relationship with Los Angeles and the disillusionment about the current situation but the lyrics are still hopeful. I still felt as if I was “twisting in the wind” and was hoping that I could make it in California financially. I had worked at a rental car company to make ends meet and was not seeing the fruit of my labor but I felt I was “paying my dues.” I was in it for the long run and not hoping for a quick fix. A heavy burden was on my shoulders that I succeed and prove different family members that I could do it. I remember having different dreams at night about being in a fog, clouds, or basically just trying to find my way. It was as if I was Moses trying to find my way out of the desert.

Recording:
I played the acoustic 12-string guitar and sang.

Jingle Jangle Instrumental

Story behind:
Jingle Jangle Instrumental is one that I’m particularly proud from the Guittard Tapes. It was recorded in my Hollywood apartment in 2000 on my Tascam 4-Track machine. I was heavily listening to the Byrds in that period. The song that I was going for was “Here Without You” on the Byrds’ Mr. Tambourine album.

My recording is quite lo-fi, a bit jazzy. I used a phaser pedal to get the psychedelic effect.

Recording:

I played the drums, Rickenbacker, acoustic guitar, and bass.

Walkie-Talkie Experiment

Story behind:
This tune was recorded probably in 2000 in Hollywood. I was into gadgets at the time having just purchased a couple of walkie-talkies that Roger McGuinn had recommended on his website. Henry McGuinn and I were listening to the Byrds’ song called “2-4-2 Fox Trot (The Lear Jet Song)” off the 5D album.

It contained a bit of gadget sounds. The sound effects inspired us and in the recording of Walkie-Talkie Experiment I was trying to emulate the experimentalism I was hearing in the Byrds. Henry and I had talked about using gadgets as part of our music and so I gave it a shot.

For the song, the lyrics were completely improvised. I set up one microphone in front of one of the walkie-talkies and then I hit the record button on the 4-track machine.

The bass line was me trying to do a lively Beachwood Sparks type thing. During those days, I tried not to miss any of the Beachwood Sparks shows if they were playing in Los Angeles.

Recording:
I played the 12-String Rickenbacker, bass guitar, drums, and sang or talked.

Ordinary Guy
I’m just an ordinary guy.
Why don’t you give me a try?
Waiting for you to come around.

Chorus
Just come to me now.
I’m just an hour away.
Just come on down to me.
I’m just an hour away.

Verse
As the sun comes up.
As the sun goes down.
I can feel you getting closer to me.
You know I want ya baby. You know it.

Chorus
Just come on down to me now.
I’m just an hour away.
Get on down here, man, babe.
You can see that I’m waiting here.

Verse
I’m just an ordinary guy.
Why don’t you give me a try?
With your cute little smile
On your cute little face.
I’d love to see ya now, babe.

Chorus
Just come on down to me now.
I’m just an hour away.
Just come on down to me.
I’ll be waiting for you.
I’m just an ordinary guy.

Story behind:
I wrote Ordinary Guy in early 2000 while sitting at the Stir Crazy Coffee Shop on Melrose Avenue in Hollywood. I had been waiting there to meet a musical acquaintance but she didn’t show up and so I was blowing off steam with writing the lyrics. Ordinary Guy was one of my first songs to write lyrics. For nine months, I had been hanging around Hollywood and nothing was panning out. I just wanted a chance and that was the sentiment in the song. It was humble I guess.

I started a duo with Henry McGuinn called the Ragas shortly thereafter. I brought my song “Ordinary Guy” out as a possible tune that the Ragas could play but Henry passed on it. It wasn’t the high quality lyrics that we needed. Henry was into songs about the beach and more groovy nature type songs. My song “Ordinary Guy” was my attempt at being real. The Ragas recorded “Ordinary Guy” but as an instrumental.

Recording:
I played the Fender Telecaster B-Bender, 12 String acoustic, sang the lead and background vocals. Vladimir Maskoff played the electric bass. It was recorded on my 4 Track Tascam machine by Brian McKay in North Hollywood.

Tremolo Instrumental
Story behind:
I recorded this on probably in late 2001 or sometime in 2002. It was my attempt at possibly shoegaze. I might have been listening to the Brian Jonestown Massacre Methodrone album.

I used a tremolo pedal. Not much else to say about it. It’s cool.

Recording:
I played drums and electric guitar.

The track in the lost interview is an experimental track called Loony also from the Guittard Tapes.

Here’s where you can find additional podcasts for the Muffin Junkee Show
Jim Guittard
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
Fort Worth, Texas June 2013

Published under Musicsend this post
2013 6 Apr

Just now releasing this one. It’s part of the “Guittard Tapes” and the tune was buried for over ten years. Now, it has the light of day. I recorded it in Los Angeles in 2001 or so. It’s heavy on the digital delay pedal with swirly organ. I intended as a prayer of sorts to God.

TIRED (PSYCHEDELIC VERSION)

TIRED (ACOUSTIC VERSION)

If you want to download the album in its entirety, go here:

Published under Musicsend this post
2012 23 Nov

The following songs were recorded mostly in Pasadena, California from 2010 – early 2012 on my Tascam 8-track machine.

 Tracks

1 2:14 122 listens
2 3:06 93 listens
3 2:25 82 listens
4 4:56 89 listens
5 4:32 98 listens
6 2:24 82 listens
7 3:03 112 listens
8 4:00 99 listens
9 2:10 118 listens
10 2:37 117 listens
Published under Musicsend this post
2012 26 Aug

This group of songs collected dust for almost a decade. In 2012, I resurrected and mixed the songs from the misplaced 4-Track Tapes I had in storage boxes in Dallas, Texas since 2006 when I went into the Peace Corps in Bulgaria.

The tunes were all recorded in Los Angeles, California during the period 1999-2003.  At that time, I was working on songs for my California Daze album. The songs I include on the Guittard Tapes were never released until now. You will find some alternate takes or early versions for a few California Daze songs: Beach and Jazz Tune.

Back then I was listening to the Byrds quite heavily and therefore many of the tunes are intentionally jangly with Rickenbacker sounds. I played the drums, bass, and even a sitar on the first track which was recorded 3 Weeks After 9-11. Other instruments I played were a 12 String Guild acoustic guitar, Fender Telecaster B-Bender, Dr. Groove Drum Machine, and various keyboards and percussion.

Notice also that there is a song called Election 2000 which is about the Bush/Gore Election.

Here is the track list:
1. 3 Weeks After 03:36
2. Aliens 03:57
3. Ordinary Guy 03:44
4. Getting There Is Not So Easy 03:15
5. Jingle Jangle Instrumental 02:44
6. Batman 02:12
7. Jazz Tune 2000 Demo 02:30
8. Beach Original 02:06
9. Station 03:02
10. Election 2000 02:00
11. Jangly Instrumental 04:09
12. Psychedelic Consciousness 03:13
13. Walkie-Talkie Experiment 02:59
14. Are You Up Instrumental 02:48
15. More Jangle 02:21
16. Tremolo Instrumental 01:20

The sheet music for Jazz Tune (track #7) that I wrote while attending the Musicians Institute during this period.

It’s DIY project. Enjoy!

Jim Guittard

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