2013 10 Jun

The Muffin Junkee episode 7 podcast.

The concept for the “Guittard Tapes” came over ten years after many of the songs were recorded. Some of the songs were actual early demos for songs for my “California Daze” album. Originally, the “Guittard Tapes” album was released in June 2012 and contained only sixteen songs. Since then I have uncovered many more songs that I consider as part of the Guittard Tapes period (1993-2003).

The cassette tapes that made up the Guittard Tapes were lost for ten years. In 2006, I had put all my belongings in several storage places in preparation to go to Bulgaria for the Peace Corps. In 2008, I returned to the States and was flopping on couches at various family members and I could not locate the tapes. I wasn’t sure where they were. I had my things in four different locations! In the spring of 2012, I was ecstatic when my dad called me to say that he had some of my stuff in his storage unit which he needed to downsize. My wife and I went to Dallas and sure enough there were the Guittard Tapes in one of my storage boxes.

It was in 1993 that my songwriting and recording began on the newly bought Tascam 4-Track machine I acquired. Instead of playing video games and zonking out on pizza, I began recording and being creative. During my college days at Western State College of Colorado, I recorded a lot of cover songs. I consider these as part of the Guittard Tapes as well but have chosen to release them separately and unofficially because they are cover songs.

In Gunnison, I began recording Tom Petty, the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, the Doors, and Nirvana. The Guittard Tapes are a look at my early writing. One of the earliest songs I wrote is called “But Not Right Now.”

It was about living in the college dorm and having to put up with rude behavior of potluck roommates. There are also some songs that I did with friends of mine where a guy named Clayton Coates who is a pastor now did the singing: A-Listen, Clayton Blues, and Gotta Get Out of this Place.


The songs were recorded in Dallas, Wichita Falls, and Huntsville, Texas, Gunnison, Colorado, and Hollywood, California. Looking back on it, I wanted to call it the Guittard Tapes because it is a nod at the infamous “Nixon Tapes.” I was born during the Nixon Administration and believe that Nixon was a gadget guy. He liked to document everything in his life and it turned out that the tapes became his downfall but in my case the tapes, to me, are my upswing. I believe the Guittard Tapes represent the initial seed of my dream. It even began before 1993 with my dad’s dictation machine and in 2013 the music holds up in its lo-fi honest way. Nixon would be proud!

I still hope to release more Guittard Tapes. The time period is significant in that the tragedy of September 11th occurred at that time. It was so innocent and optimistic before 9-11 and after became more cynical and pessimistic. However, the tapes are a slice of time and the music is available for everyone to listen and download. The process of extracting the music from the tapes to MP3 format was quite complicating.

Transferring process:
What I had to do was record each track separately from the old tapes on the old Tascam 4-Track machine to my new digital 4-track machine by lining in a guitar cord from the old tape 4-Track to the new one. Each track was done one at a time. The tricky part is the starting point for the individual tracks in a song may not always line up to the other tracks of the song. Also, the second track on the cassette 4track machine didn’t sound. So I had to flip the tape over and then the second track could be heard but backwards in the 3rd track spot.

After transferring all the tracks of a song to the digital another challenge is that the speed of the old 4-Track is at a different speed than the digital. So basically what you hear on the digital sounds like chipmunks. To fix this, I had to dump the tracks from the digital 4-Track to my laptop which has Adobe Audition 3. There, I was able to fix the second track. I would reverse it back to how it should be. And then I had to slow down the digital tracks so that it would sound “normal” speed.

Some of the tracks are still a bit out of rhythm because I was doing it mainly by ear when mixing it on the laptop. Some of the songs had a count off for a guide but many of the songs did not. Many times the count off sound bled into the other tracks and that helped me to make sure everything was lined up as good as possible.

It was quite a process. I even did some math to figure out how much time to cut. I looked for a certain lyric I sang in the song and marked the timing notation of the editing software and lined things up with that number. It was not exact but that’s what I did. I’m sure there would be more exact ways.

Bob and Jim Guittard UT Austin – May 2001

Bob's Graduation 2001 Austin Texas

Gotta Get Out of Here
Waiting Around this hard ol’ town.                                                                                                                                                                                                Gotta get outta here.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 The freaks and the bums all being dumb.
Gotta get outta here.                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Hearing the sound in the corner lounge.                                                                                                                                                                                           Gotta get outta here.                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Seeing an Elvis walk on by.
Gotta get outta here.
Saw a girl walk on by.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                I think I’ll stay for a while.
Repeat all 1X

Story behind:
In 2001, I wrote the lyrics for this one while sitting in the lobby of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. The hotel is known for being the place where the first Academy Awards took place in 1929. It was just down the street from where I lived while I was attending the Musicians Institute.

At that time, I was getting a bit weary of the Hollywood scene. The music school had turned out to be disappointing and Hollyweird was taking its toll on me. I wanted to move to a different location because of a home invasion robbery and because it seemed that freaks and tourists were everywhere along Hollywood Blvd.

One time while waiting at Hollywood and Highland, a complete stranger asked me if I wanted some hash. I noticed quickly that there was a guy dressed up as Elvis standing close by and told the drug pusher pointing to Elvis that I didn’t want any hash but that Elvis might. The “Elvis” impersonator quickly told the drug pusher that he didn’t feel called to smoke hash. For this song, my writing method was to sit and observe. In the song, I make reference to this “Elvis” that I had seen around. There was a lounge at the Hollywood Roosevelt named the Cinegrill. It was where Gene Clark (the Byrds’ tambourine man) last performed in April 1991 before his death about a month later. (When I first got to Hollywood, my mother took a photo of me under the Cinegrill sign. I hadn’t learned about Gene Clark performing there yet.)

Recording: It was recorded after the move to a new apartment in the Los Feliz area of Los Angeles on a Tascam 4-Track machine. I played a 12-String acoustic guitar with and without a capo, drums, and did the singing.

Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel (Cinegrill) 1999 – Hollywood Boulevard

Jim Cine Grill

Tired (Acoustic/Psychedelic Version)
Tired of being sad
Tired of being mad
I do the right thing
But I can’t feel my wings and fly.

Tired of being sad
Tired of being mad
I do the right thing
But I can’t feel my wings and fly.

Chorus
When will I do what You want?
When will I stop having to pretend?
I hate feeling bad.
I want to feel the way I did
As a kid.

Tired of feeling bad
Tired of feeling mad

Story behind:
Both of the versions were recorded in 2001 about the same time in Los Angeles on my 4-Track Tascam machine. At the time, I often experimented with sounds by using my BOSS Digital Delay pedal as a tool to create or inspire me. The Psychedelic Version of Tired is pretty experimental. I hooked up the pedal to an electric keyboard and got some interesting sounds. I had been turned onto Roland’s Vintage Space Echo machine. I was trying to get that kind of sound with my digital delay pedal.

The tune had a kind of weary feel to it. I was just tired of “twisting in the wind.” The phrase came to me as my brother called me once to get a status update on my goings on in California after he had returned to Texas earlier that year. I was digging my heels firmly trying to prove that I could make it in California. I was waiting on the right thing to happen but was getting mad that it wasn’t happening. The song was also a kind of prayer.

Recording:
Psychedelic Version – Acoustic guitar, keyboards, and singing.
Acoustic Version – Acoustic guitar and Singing.

Getting There Is Not Easy
Just wanna be right.
Just wanna be fine.
Something’ll come in time.
Getting there is not easy.
Getting there is not easy

Just wanna move weight.
Just wanna stand straight.
Something’ll give to flight.
Getting there is not easy.
Getting there is not so easy.

Just wanna break through.
Just wanna be free.
Something’ll give to might.
Getting there is not so easy.
Getting there is not so easy.

Just wanna be real.
Just wanna have sight.
Something will show real bright.
Getting there is not so easy.
Getting there is not so easy.

Just wanna be right.
Just wanna be fine.
Something’ll come in time.
Getting there is not so easy.
Getting there is not so easy.

Just wanna move weight.
Just wanna stand straight.
Something will give to flight.
Getting there is not so easy.

Story behind:
It was recorded in January 2002 with a Byrds influence. The song is similar in spirit with “Gotta Get Out of Here.” It speaks about my love-hate relationship with Los Angeles and the disillusionment about the current situation but the lyrics are still hopeful. I still felt as if I was “twisting in the wind” and was hoping that I could make it in California financially. I had worked at a rental car company to make ends meet and was not seeing the fruit of my labor but I felt I was “paying my dues.” I was in it for the long run and not hoping for a quick fix. A heavy burden was on my shoulders that I succeed and prove different family members that I could do it. I remember having different dreams at night about being in a fog, clouds, or basically just trying to find my way. It was as if I was Moses trying to find my way out of the desert.

Recording:
I played the acoustic 12-string guitar and sang.

Jingle Jangle Instrumental

Story behind:
Jingle Jangle Instrumental is one that I’m particularly proud from the Guittard Tapes. It was recorded in my Hollywood apartment in 2000 on my Tascam 4-Track machine. I was heavily listening to the Byrds in that period. The song that I was going for was “Here Without You” on the Byrds’ Mr. Tambourine album.

My recording is quite lo-fi, a bit jazzy. I used a phaser pedal to get the psychedelic effect.

Recording:

I played the drums, Rickenbacker, acoustic guitar, and bass.

Walkie-Talkie Experiment

Story behind:
This tune was recorded probably in 2000 in Hollywood. I was into gadgets at the time having just purchased a couple of walkie-talkies that Roger McGuinn had recommended on his website. Henry McGuinn and I were listening to the Byrds’ song called “2-4-2 Fox Trot (The Lear Jet Song)” off the 5D album.

It contained a bit of gadget sounds. The sound effects inspired us and in the recording of Walkie-Talkie Experiment I was trying to emulate the experimentalism I was hearing in the Byrds. Henry and I had talked about using gadgets as part of our music and so I gave it a shot.

For the song, the lyrics were completely improvised. I set up one microphone in front of one of the walkie-talkies and then I hit the record button on the 4-track machine.

The bass line was me trying to do a lively Beachwood Sparks type thing. During those days, I tried not to miss any of the Beachwood Sparks shows if they were playing in Los Angeles.

Recording:
I played the 12-String Rickenbacker, bass guitar, drums, and sang or talked.

Ordinary Guy
I’m just an ordinary guy.
Why don’t you give me a try?
Waiting for you to come around.

Chorus
Just come to me now.
I’m just an hour away.
Just come on down to me.
I’m just an hour away.

Verse
As the sun comes up.
As the sun goes down.
I can feel you getting closer to me.
You know I want ya baby. You know it.

Chorus
Just come on down to me now.
I’m just an hour away.
Get on down here, man, babe.
You can see that I’m waiting here.

Verse
I’m just an ordinary guy.
Why don’t you give me a try?
With your cute little smile
On your cute little face.
I’d love to see ya now, babe.

Chorus
Just come on down to me now.
I’m just an hour away.
Just come on down to me.
I’ll be waiting for you.
I’m just an ordinary guy.

Story behind:
I wrote Ordinary Guy in early 2000 while sitting at the Stir Crazy Coffee Shop on Melrose Avenue in Hollywood. I had been waiting there to meet a musical acquaintance but she didn’t show up and so I was blowing off steam with writing the lyrics. Ordinary Guy was one of my first songs to write lyrics. For nine months, I had been hanging around Hollywood and nothing was panning out. I just wanted a chance and that was the sentiment in the song. It was humble I guess.

I started a duo with Henry McGuinn called the Ragas shortly thereafter. I brought my song “Ordinary Guy” out as a possible tune that the Ragas could play but Henry passed on it. It wasn’t the high quality lyrics that we needed. Henry was into songs about the beach and more groovy nature type songs. My song “Ordinary Guy” was my attempt at being real. The Ragas recorded “Ordinary Guy” but as an instrumental.

Recording:
I played the Fender Telecaster B-Bender, 12 String acoustic, sang the lead and background vocals. Vladimir Maskoff played the electric bass. It was recorded on my 4 Track Tascam machine by Brian McKay in North Hollywood.

Tremolo Instrumental
Story behind:
I recorded this on probably in late 2001 or sometime in 2002. It was my attempt at possibly shoegaze. I might have been listening to the Brian Jonestown Massacre Methodrone album.

I used a tremolo pedal. Not much else to say about it. It’s cool.

Recording:
I played drums and electric guitar.

The track in the lost interview is an experimental track called Loony also from the Guittard Tapes.

Here’s where you can find additional podcasts for the Muffin Junkee Show
Jim Guittard
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
Fort Worth, Texas June 2013

Published under Musicsend this post
2013 2 May

Covers by Jim Guittard and Friends

I’m releasing these songs because I thought, “why not?”

The time period the songs were recorded is from 1994-2002 and in various cities: Dallas, Los Angeles, Austin, and Gunnison (Colorado).

It was in college in Gunnison, Colorado at Western State College that I started recording music on my Tascam 4-Track machine. In 1993, at that point, I hadn’t really started to write any of my own songs. Initially, I would make up different lyrics to songs I knew. I had read that that was what John Lennon did when he started out. He had some gig with the Quarrymen at a church and didn’t have any songs of his own so he improvised words to the Del Vikings “Come Go With Me.”

The tunes for my covers album are:

01. Captain Soul – (The original tune is an instrumental on the Byrds 5D album.)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Lead and rhythm guitar, drums, bass, and hand claps.  Recorded in Los Angeles around 2001.

02. Cars Hiss By My Window – (The original is a Doors song off L.A. Woman album complete with scat singing ala Morrison style.)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Vocals, lead and rhythm guitars.  Recorded in Gunnison, Colorado around 1994.

03. Eight Miles High – (The original is a Byrds tune off the 5D album again. It does not have the Coltrane type 12-string lead Rickenbacker.)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Lead and background vocals, and guitars.  Recorded in Los Angeles around 2001-2.

04. Get Back – (Beatles tune on the “Let It Be” album.)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Vocals, lead and rhythm guitar.  Recorded in Dallas or Gunnison, Colorado around 1994.

05. Hare Krshna Mantra – (This is an obscure George Harrison tune that he did with the Hare Krishnas for an album.

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Vocals, keyboard, acoustic guitar, and percussion.  Recorded in Dallas around 1997 or so.

06. Inner Light – (This originally was a George Harrison tune B-side to Lady Madonna.)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Lead and background vocals, lead guitar, drone keyboard.  Recorded in Dallas, Texas around 1997.

07. Mr. Tambourine Man – (Originally this was a Bob Dylan tune but Henry McGuinn and I did it in our duo the Ragas. We did it more like the Byrds version.)

Personnel: Henry McGuinn – Lead Vocals and lead acoustic guitar; Jim Guittard – Background vocals and acoustic rhythm guitar.  It was recorded in 2000 in Los Angeles.

08. You Ain’t Going Nowhere – (This was originally a Bob Dylan tune which was on the Basement Tapes sessions with the Band but here is the Ragas covering it based up the Byrds cover off the Sweetheart of the Rodeo album.)

Personnel: Henry McGuinn – Lead Vocals and lead acoustic guitar; Jim Guittard – Background vocals and acoustic rhythm guitar.  It was recorded in 2000 in Los Angeles.

09. No Reply – (This was based off the Beatles tune on the Beatles for Sale/Beatles ’65 albums.)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Vocals: lead and background, two rhythm guitars.  It was recorded in Gunnison, Colorado.

10 Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) – (Here the song is based off the Beatles original from the Rubber Soul album.)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Vocals:  lead and background, rhythm guitar, and sitar.  Song was recorded in Dallas, Texas around 1997.

11. Sun King – (The original is from the Beatles Abbey Road album.)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Vocals:  lead and background, lead and rhythm guitars.  It was recorded in Gunnison, Colorado in 1994.

12. Thoughts and Words – (This original is a Chris Hillman psychedelic tune from the Byrds’ album Younger Than Yesterday.)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Vocals:  lead and background, lead and rhythm guitars.  It was recorded in Los Angeles in 2001.

13. Ticket To Ride – (The Original is from the Beatles Help! album.)

Personnel:  Bob Guittard – Lead Vocals, lead guitar.  Graham Cathy – Drums.  Jim Guittard – background vocals, rhythm guitar, and bass.  Song was recorded in Dallas in 1995.

14. Eight Miles High – (This is the Ragas version of the Byrds original from the 5D album.)

Personnel: Henry McGuinn – Lead Vocals and lead acoustic guitar; Jim Guittard – Background vocals and acoustic rhythm guitar.  It was recorded in 2000 in Los Angeles.

15. Norwegian Wood (This Byrd Has Flown) – (The Ragas version of the Beatles tune.)

Personnel: Henry McGuinn – Lead Vocals and lead acoustic guitar; Jim Guittard – Background vocals, acoustic rhythm guitar, and percussion.  It was recorded in 2000 in Dallas, Texas.

16. Nobody’s Fault But My Own – (The original is a Beck tune off his 1999 album Mutations. The cover version was sent as a demo take for Jim to enter the Musicians Institute music school in Los Angeles,)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Vocals:  lead and background, sitar, and 12-string acoustic guitar.  Song was recorded in Dallas, Texas in 1999.

17. Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge on Seattle – (This original is a Nirvana tune off the In Utero album.)

Personnel:  Jim Guittard – Vocals, lead and rhythm guitars, wah pedal and effects.  The cover version was recorded in Gunnison, Colorado in the dorms at Western State College.

Published under Musicsend this post
2008 18 Apr

February 2000, Los Angeles, California

I drove up to the Sherman Oaks, California Guitar Center on Ventura. I had grown tired of the Guitar Center on Sunset Blvd and all the tourists. It was so loud. On this particular day, I walked in wearing my John Lennon T-Shirt that said New York City.

John Lennon - New York City

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had gone in to look for a new amplifier. I looked around the store quickly and decided that I had seen enough. I walked out the front door and down the street and decided, no I was going back in.

Inside I found a white Fender Stratocaster and got a power cord and plugged into a Fender amp. I began playing jazz chords. After a few minutes and while I was still playing a guy came up to me.

This was Henry McGuinn. He said, “Hey man. I like your playing. What’s happening? Do you like the Byrds?”

I said, “Yeah, I guess so. I don’t have any of their albums but I like Mr. Tambourine Man and Eight Miles High. That’s all I know.”

Henry said, “My dad’s Roger McGuinn, who started the Byrds.”

I said, “Yeah, man, that’s cool. Can I see your ID?”

Roger McGuinn - Rock and Roll Hall of Famer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We talked in the store for about twenty minutes. We spoke about the Beatles, Bob Dylan, and the Rolling Stones. I finally found someone I could relate to with this type of music. My meeting with Henry left me with renewed purpose. It seemed that I was just waiting around a bit in Hollywood to find the right people. I figured sooner or later I would find someone. I left the Guitar Center stoked, thinking of the possibilities. I guess I was a bit star-struck, too.

The next day, I went to the Warehouse on Sunset Blvd. to look for some Byrds music. I found and bought 5D. It was the Byrds 1966 album that had Eight Miles High, Mr. Spaceman, and I See You on it. I listened to the album a few times and decided to call Henry.

I left a message and an hour or so later he called from a pay phone.

Henry, “Hey, what’s happening? This is Henry McGuinn.”

I said enthusiastically, “Hey, Henry, yeah this is Jim. I met you at the Guitar Center.”

Henry said, “Yeah cool. I’m out by the beach just loving it.”

I said, “I bought 5D. It’s really cool. I haven’t ever really listened to the Byrds but they are really hip.”

The Byrds - Fifth Dimension

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henry said, “Yeah, they’re all good, especially ’65-’68 era. Well, so you want to get together?”

I said, “How bout tomorrow? We could have lunch and then jam.”

Henry, “Yeah, I just want to meet and see if we have chemistry, you know.”

Boy I was excited, the chance to play with someone that liked the same music I did and the fact that his dad is a rock star is totally rad!

The next day I met him outside at his truck. We brought up his guitar and then we walked to a Sandwich shop right up Las Palmas in Hollywood. We ate and talked music and began to get to know each other. We seemed to be on such a similar wavelength. It was kind of amazing chemistry really.

After lunch, we opened up our guitars. He brought out his acoustic 12- String Martin guitar. At first, I just listened to him. He sang a few Byrds tunes. He sang Tambourine Man and You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere and I believe he sang the Christian Life as well. At the time I had never heard the Christian Life and I was stoked on it. I was really inspired to start playing.

The next few times that we met, we listened to Byrds music. At the Tower Records, I loaded up on all sorts of music that he recommended. I was really into it. I bought several Flying Burrito Brothers albums, some Gram Parsons and Lovin’ Spoonful.

Our music was finally coming together. We were playing some Beatles, Byrds, and Dylan covers and some of our new stuff. He played me his cool song called Summertime that he wrote at the beach inspired by George Harrison and What You Say a song about running away and pure Byrds. I loved it. I added some rhythm guitar to it while he did his fingerpicking style soloing inspired by his father.

One day Henry brought over his 12-String Guitar Instructional Video that his dad had done. On the video his dad went wild on the 12- String Rickenbacker playing his old classics. I was again blown away.

McGuinn 12-String Instructional Video

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now prior to that point I had always thought that the Beatles were my number one group but I now believed that the Byrds were up there with them. It was great to learn more about music. I did not feel bad about buying a lot of records. I considered it an investment: The Who ’65, The Zombies, The Association, Beach Boys Pet Sounds, The Kinks, Gram Parsons, and the Flying Burrito Brothers.

The next thing I did was to buy the Johnny Rogan Byrds biography. Henry had been talking about it. It was the only complete Byrds biography written. I found it at the Book Soup book store on Sunset Strip right across the street from Tower Records. Henry and I considered it our manual on how to live a Byrdsian lifestyle.

I met Henry in February 2000 and in March South by Southwest music festival raged in Austin, Texas. We found out that Roger was playing at the Cactus Lounge on the University of Texas Campus. We felt it was a good excuse for a road trip.

Before we left, Henry and I made a trip down to the Rickenbacker factory in Santa Ana. At Rickenbacker, we both waited in the reception area. Shortly after, John Hall, the CEO, came out and I was introduced.

Henry told me stories of John Hall and the Beatles. John Hall had been to the Beatles’ Hollywood Bowl show in 1965 as a teenager and had met all the Beatles and the Byrds. John Lennon and George Harrison both played guitars that were given to them by Rickenbacker and Crosby and then Jim McGuinn would run down to S.A. for Rick customizations . Needless to say, Rickenbacker has had great influence on Rock & Roll. Henry’s father worked with Rickenbacker in designing a custom signature 12-String guitar with an on board compressor. What resulted was the wood colored (Maple Glo) Rickenbacker 370 Model. Henry is totally proud of his father.

While Henry talked with John in his office, I sat down and looked at magazines. We were there for Henry to interview for a job with Rickenbacker. I sat and waited for fifteen minutes and then Henry returned, full of hope for the future. We said our good byes to John Hall and Henry told John that he would get back in touch after our trip to Austin.

I felt on the in-crowd a bit. Rickenbacker had worked with all sorts of artists: REM, Tom Petty, Susana Hoffs, Carl Wilson, etc. I have a Rickenbacker FG 330 from those days. Henry on the 325Byrd and me on the 330 is some of the best noise ever! All the best bands play Rickenbacker.

Hope you enjoyed the read.

Henry McGuinn and Jim Guittard - Austin, Texas SXSW 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henry and I put up a website for our band the Ragas. You can check it out at:

http://www.jamendo.com/en/artist/339962/the-ragas

2007 17 Nov

I think we should get back to the mindset of the past. At least the more open-minded thinking of the ’60’s. You say, oh, let’s don’t live in the past, let’s move forward.

I counter you with, “the thinking of the 1960’s was more healthy I think than today.” I’m all about moving forward and it seems that this period was about moving forward for the better.

It is my opinion that if all listened to the music of the ’60’s or that type of thinking then the world would be that much better. You’ve all heard the saying “garbage in garbage out.” Well, put this more positive type of thinking In.

Here’s my top songs that may clean up the pessimistic or status quo thinking. Just look to the words for inspiration out of this fearful terrorist world we live.

1. Bob Dylan – The Times Are A-Changin’

2. The Beatles – Think For Yourself

3. Gene Clark – Keep On Pushin’

4. Stephen Stills (Manassas) – Jesus Gave Love Away For Free

5. The Zombies – Time Of The Season

6. The Byrds – Turn, Turn, Turn

7. The Rolling Stones – Salt of the Earth

8. The Association – The Time Is Today

9. The Kinks – Animal Farm

10. George Harrison – What Is Life?

11. Pink Floyd – Burnin’ Bridges

12. The Beach Boys – I Know There’s An Answer

13. Buffalo Springfield – For What It’s Worth

14. Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young – Teach Your Children

15. Donovan – Catch The Wind

16. The Doors – Take It As It Comes

17. John Lennon – Give Me Some Truth

18. The Lovin’ Spoonful – Do You Believe In Magic?

19. Simon and Garfunkle – Bridge Over Troubled Water

20. Sly and The Family Stone – Everybody Is A Star

2007 2 Feb

My girlfriend turned me onto the Bulgarian rock band, Shturcite, and amazingly I met Petar Gyuzelev, a founding member of the band. It was just last weekend in Sofia at a church. Petar plays the guitar and sings. I spoke with him in my bad Bulgarian and he understood me. I asked if he was in the Shturcite band and he said, “Da.”

Then I told him about living in Hollywood and playing with the son of Roger McGuinn. I asked if he knew of the Byrds and he said yes and then we talked about David Crosby and his other band. It was cool to rap with a legendary Bulgarian Rock and Roller.

Here are some clips I found on Youtube of the band.

Rock In Past Tense

Kletva

Rock’N’Roll Music

2006 4 Oct

 

  1. The Beatles – Rubber Soul – 1965
  2. Bob Dylan – Bringing it All Back Home – 1965
  3. The Rolling Stones – Exile On Mainstreet – 1972
  4. Love – Forever Changes – 1967
  5. The Dandy Warhols – Dandy’s Rule Ok – 1995
  6. Beachwood Sparks – Beachwood Sparks – 2000
  7. The Beach Boys – Pet Sounds – 1966
  8. The Brian Jonestown Massacre – Give It Back – 1997
  9. Miles Davis – Bitches Brew – 1970
  10.  Beck – Odelay – 1996
  11.  Son Volt – Trace – 1995
  12.  The Byrds – Notorious Byrd Brothers – 1968
  13.  Black Rebel Motorcycle Club – Howl – 2005
  14. The Kinks – The Kinks are the Village Green Preservation Society – 1968
  15. Merle Haggard and the Strangers – Lonesome Fugitive 1967
  16. The Tyde – Twice – 2003
  17. Uncle Tupelo – March 16-20, 1992 – 1992
  18. The Doors – Morrison Hotel – 1970
  19. Stephen Stills – Manassas – 1972
  20. David Bowie – Aladdin Sane – 1973
  21. My Bloody Valentine – Ecstacy and Wine – 1989
  22. Pink Floyd – Piper at the Gates of Dawn – 1967
  23. George Harrison – All Things Must Pass – 1970
  24. The Warlocks – The Warlocks – 2000
  25. The Velvet Underground – The Velvet Underground and Nico – 1967
  26. The Brian Jonestown Massacre – Strung Out In Heaven – 1998
  27. The Rolling Stones – Beggars Banquet – 1968
  28. Buffalo Springfield – Buffalo Springfield – 1967
  29. The Electric Prunes – Underground – 1967
  30. The Byrds – Fifth Dimension – 1966
  31. The Monkees – Head –  1968
  32. Johnny Cash – At Folsom Prison – 1968
  33. Donovan – Greatest Hits – 1969
  34. Neil Young – Tonight’s the Night – 1975
  35. Led Zeppelin – Houses of The Holy – 1973
  36. The Flying Burrito Bros – Hot Burritos! The Flying Burrito Bros. Anthology 2000
  37. Echo And The Bunnymen – Ocean Rain – 1984
  38. Ride – Nowhere – 1990
  39. U2 – The Joshua Tree – 1987
  40. INXS – Kick – 1987
  41. Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Into The Great Wide Open – 1991
  42. Pearl Jam – No Code – 1996
  43. Poco – Pickin’ Up The Pieces – 1969
  44. The Cure – Disintegration – 1989
  45. Return To Forever – No Mystery – 1975
  46. Antonio Carlos Jobim – Stone Flower – 1970
  47. The Who – The Who Sell Out – 1967
  48. The Zombies – The Singles Collection: A’s & B’s, 1964-1969 -2000
  49. The Association – Greatest Hits – 1968
  50. The Lovin’ Spoonful – Greatest Hits – 2000